The move will take place over “the next few months” and allow Android Pay devices to be used as a tap and pay substitute for credit and debit cards.

According to Google’s announcement blog, Android Pay has only been available in the US since September, but has been “growing steadily with 1.5 million new registrations happening each month”.

Android PayTo take advantage of the service, users need to have a device which is using Android 4.4 or higher and fitted with a near field communication chip. In theory, the service is safer to use than a physical credit or debit card as the owner does not need to reveal their account number at the time of purchase and hackers would not be able to re-use transmitted information for further payments.

Several banks including Lloyds Bank, Nationwide and HSBC have already said that they will support the scheme in the UK. American Express, Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland and Santander have still to be signed up for the scheme, but Google anticipates it will add more organisations to the list before launch.

Samsung Rivalry

Carolina Milanesi, California-based analyst spoke at the Kantar Worldpanel Comtech, and compared Samsung and Android technologies. She stated that “Samsung Pay has made a bigger impact here than Android Pay and is being advertised more heavily, if you look at the type of early adopters most likely to buy into the idea of wanting to do everything via their smartphone, they normally fit with the type of person who buys a high-end Apple or Samsung device.”

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